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20 Jun '14

SUMMER 2014 “PERCEPTION” DELIVERY 1 (SECOND RELEASE)

Releasing in-store and online this Saturday, June 21st, 2014.
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Aloha kākou!
We present to you the second release of our Summer 2014 “Perception” Delivery 1 collection. With three new patterns (Maiʻa, Vanquish, and Kālā Pepa) as our foundation, we explore the perception of Hawaii from the outside looking in as well as the inside looking out.

KĀLĀ PEPA
"Kālā" or what we call "Kālā pepa" refers to the brief history of the Hawaiian currency and how it represents not only the transition from the barter system but how a rich and prolific culture succumbed to the imperialistic mentallity that dominated the times.
When Capt. James Cook introduced the outside world to a once thriving Hawaiian culture, it became important to establish a currency for the exchange of commodities such as sandalwood and whaling. Starting off with gold and silver from other countries, it soon became apparent that there was not enough of those precious metals to go around, especially with the rapidly growing plantation industry. As a result, plantations began implementing a paper script in 1837 that workers would redeem for goods at their local store. In 1847, King Kamehameha III introduced the first coinage in the form of “keneta” (one cent coins). This was later replaced with paper and coin currency that was backed 100% by gold and silver deposits, under the rule of the worldly King Kalākaua. In the years to follow, kālā would go through many changes under the Republic of Hawaii. It was finally demonetized and replaced with U.S. currency, which remains until this day.
The last variation of Hawaii-branded currency was known as the Brown Seal Notes, which the U.S. issued after the Pearl Harbor attack. In denominations of $1, $5, $10, and $20, these notes contained "HAWAII" printed small on the left and right sides of the front, and displayed largely across the back. In the worst case scenario that enemy forces ever captured Hawaii and had access to the money in circulation, the “HAWAII” branded banknotes would be deemed worthless by the U.S. government. Although these rare currencies are now worth significantly more in the collectors market (yet nothing everywhere else), they are ultimately part of a larger realization of how a thriving Hawaiian nation got manipulated by a rapidly changing environment.
 
Kālā Pepa Bucket
Features an all over sublimated Kālā Pepa pattern on a polyester bucket hat.
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Kālā Pepa Pacific Standard 5-Panel Camp
All over sublimated Kālā Pepa pattern on a polyester 5-panel camper. Features our Pacific Standard label stitched on the front with white side crown and back crest. A black clip enclosure completes the look.
front
back
left
right
 
The King Tee - White
On a white tee, this design features “Aloha Served Daily” in an abstract Art Deco style over a photo of Elvis surrounded by wahine, showing us how The King serves aloha daily. Also features a small mango crown on the upper back.
front
back
 
The King Tee - Topaz
On a topaz tee, this design features “Aloha Served Daily” in an abstract Art Deco style over a photo of Elvis surrounded by wahine, showing us how The King serves aloha daily. Also features a small mango crown on the upper back.
front
back